Museum of The Western Han Dynasty

This is the full name called: Museum of The Western Han Dynasty Mausoleum of the Hanyue King. This is another extraordinary ancient heritage in Guangzhou which you must-go to visit.

This is the tomb of the second king of the Southern Yue, Zhao Mo who styled himself the Civilian Emperor and who was grandson of Qing’s general Zhao Tuo who united Lingnan area. This tomb has a history of 2,100 year.

The tomb was discovered in June 1983. After being excavated, the tomb museum of Southern Yue’s king was built at the tomb’s original site. This is an important heritage under the national protection. The museum covers an area of 14,000 square meters, including two sections, i.e. tomb’s protection section and comprehensive display section.

The display section is a three-storied building. This building displays lots of relics excavated from the tomb. There is a huge relief sculpture on the red sandstone wall of the main entrance, depiction Yue people holding snakes, dragons and tigers. There is a pair of stone tigers standing by the gate. These decorations reflect this tomb’s features of combining Middle China’s Han culture and Southern China’s Yue culture.

Unfortunately their official website it’s only chinese version.

Entrance ticket is only 10RMB, located behind China Hotel. You can get there by Metro as well. Out of Metro station Yue xiu gong yuan; then exist D; taxi will be 15 to 25 from downtown.

Location – No. 867, Jiefang North Road, Guangzhou

Chinese: 西汉南越墓博物馆, 广州市解放北路867号 (show as image)
Directions: Behind China Hotel
Open: 9am-5pm
Phone: +86 20 3618 1885
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Website: gznywm.yahtour.com
Email: gznywm@public.guangzhou.gd.cn

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